Side Street

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz and E Luskin

Story

This is the opening cut from Subourbon Road.    Everyone has a day job that often keeps them awake at night.  Who can't relate to that?  So this is the story of struggling to succeed  - while at the same time just wishing for peace and equilibrium.  If you figure out how to do that, let us know.

 

George Pultz: Acoustic guitar and lead vocals

Eric Luskin: Bass, electric guitars and backing vocals

Bob Littman: Violin, mandolin and backing vocals

Doug Kwartler: Drums and backing vocals

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz, E Luskin, R Littman

Story

Preview clip only.  The first song Side Street ever recorded with Doug Kwartler at Hollow Body Studios.  It exceeded our expectations, so we started recording more...

Side Street
4/17/17
E Luskin

Story

This song was inspired by a simple sound.  There are artists who specialize in music known as "field recording" - sounds from the world, from nature, etc.  In this case, I had recorded the sound of a screen door on my i-phone when my wife and I were off in Vermont at an old inn.  And, like many things one can record on an I-phone, I forgot about it.  A few years later, I re-encountered this - there was an enigmatic quality about it.  Was it just a door closing, or a door forcefully being slammed?  Out of that, The Screen Door was born.

A quick word about the production. I recorded the vocal and guitar at home to a strange percussion track that I half liked and half hated.  I reluctantly brought the tracks to Hollow Body Studios where Bob recorded a fiddle part at the end of another session.  I was unsure this would work as a Side Street song, so we left it to marinate for a while. 

When we returned for our next session, Doug played this for us, having added a new drum track, dobro, kitchen percussion and bass.  George added some harmony vocals and - voila.  THAT is the value of a good producer (who also happens to be a damned fine musician).

George Pultz: Background vocals

Eric Luskin: Acoustic guitar and lead vocals

Bob Littman: Fiddle

Doug Kwartler: Drums, dobro and bass

Lyrics

The Screen Door
Eric Luskin
Awking Songs, BMI

 

When the screen door slams I’ll be out that door for good
When the screen door slams I ain’t out back chopping wood
It’s been far too long since we’ve had peace
No matter what I do you scream and it don’t cease
When the screen door slams


When we built this home I said “babe It’s just for us”
When we laid the stone we were new and full of trust
Then the thunder came and the roof it leaked
The dog went lame had to put him down that week
When we built this home



With everything to live for things began to die
And if the end is nearing we’re still the fools who tried


When I call on God and promise I will change
When I call on God belief seems mighty strange
It’s been far too long since we’ve known peace
No matter what we do we make a mess of things
When I call on God


And if the end is nearing am I a fool to try
When the screen door slams I’ll be out that door for good

Side Street
4/17/17
GSPultz + E Luskin

Story

Full song preview.  

In case you're wondering, the story is based on an imagined prequel to Jerry Garcia and Robert Hunter's The Cumberland Blues. Or that's what George claims!

The band had a blast recording Malinda. But the original was missing something... Finally, Eric decided that the "you make me roar" lyric called for a roaring saxophone solo. Enter Jersey's own Richard Reiter, who nailed the feel and got the party started. Ever since we locked down this mix, we've been itching to take Malinda on the road.

 

George Pultz: Acoustic guitar and lead vocals

Eric Luskin: Bass and electric guitar 

Bob Littman: Violin and mandolin 

Doug Kwartler: Drum kit, electric guitars, Rhodes keyboard, synth horns, backing vocals and other various noise 

Richard Reiter (appearing courtesy of City Pigeon Records): Tenor saxophone

Lyrics

Well dance Malinda, just swing that thing. You make me sing Malinda. Yeah dance Malinda. You swing that thing. That makes me sing Malinda.  When you take the room, I don’t see no one else. Like a smoldering diva to a miner’s son you look so hot.  Well dance, Malinda just swing that thing. Don’t need no ring Malinda. Coming down the road you sure mean business.  You’re so phat and gritty in the back of your truck you make me roar.  The way you move all night you do mean business.  But when you’re wearing your troubles in a flatbed load you still look hot.   Well dance, Malinda. Just swing that thing. You make me sing Malinda. 

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz

Story

Preview clip only.

Side Street
2/17/17
R Littman

Story

This one speaks for itself!

 

Bob Littman: Mando and lead vocals

George Pultz: Acoustic guitar and backing vocals

Eric Luskin: Acoustic lead guitar, bass and backing vocals

Doug Kwartler: Percussion, dobro, keys and bass

Lyrics

I see the writing on the wall. A clear message, speaks about the fall. What might have been may not occur at all. It makes no difference no matter where you are. A clear song beckons; one you can’t ignore. Silent witness; silence to the core. A tick in time, grapes on the vine, vintage wine takes time. Eyes straight ahead, don’t look around, stay course is what they said. A world divided is a recipe for war. Has it been decided? Have we shut the door? Or will we hear the writing the wall? The clearest message: a message for us all. 

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz

Story

Preview clip only...

Side Street
4/17/17
R Littman

Story

Preview clip only...

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz and Stephen Greenberg

Story

The concept for Living on the Outside of the Law came about one day when Steve and I were sitting around trying to write some songs together.  One song that both of us were really into was Bob Dylan's All Along the Watchtower, a classic whose covers (Jimi Hendrix and Dave Mason) may be more famous than the original.


Anyway, Steve and I were talking about the image in the last line of the song, "two riders were approaching and the wind began to howl."  We were like, what's up with these two guys; where are they going; what have they seen.  So we decided to tell the story of the two riders.  

From "the wind began to howl" we got to "desert, wind and lightning", and the rest of the song just seemed to flow from there.  

We finished the lyrics right there that day, with our 2 riders living outside of the fortress that the watchtower is protecting.  They are also outside of the laws that bind all of the folks living inside the heavy walls of the fortress.  Although those inside are kept them from danger and the unpredictable, they are confined by both the walls and laws of the fortress.  Our riders, while on the outside, must follow nature's laws, which are illustrated in part by the wildcat and stallion in the 3rd verse.

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz

Story

Preview clip only...

Side Street
4/17/17
GS Pultz

Story

Preview clip only...